Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen

Channel 7 – The Great Day Out TV Show

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Check out Epic Ocean Adventures showcasing the spectacular region on channel 7’s The Great Day Out. See the migrating whales passing super close to the beach and charging north to the migrating waters. The Great Sandy National Park and magical Rainbow Beach coloured sands are also a tour highlight. Thanks for coming along Sofie!

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
Curious Humpback whale encounter on tour

Curious Humpback whale encounter on tour

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We were lucky enough to be greeted by an adolescent Humpback Whale on our casual paddle at Double Island from Noosa and Rainbow Beach. As you can see the whale approached super close and then swam under our kayak for a better look. This isn’t an everyday occurrence but when it does happen everyone gets pretty excited! We are still seeing most whales passing by heading north keen to get up to migrating waters but we can confirm that we are already starting to see some whales migrating south again. Sometimes when they do come south they swim a little closer to shore and rest in the bays with their new born.

As we always say on our tours and in the wild, you never know what you might see in this spectacular National Park but there is always plenty of activity. Conditions have been no less than ideal for our tours and we a wrapped to be able to showcase this stunning region to so many new travelers and holiday makers.

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
Perfect Tour Conditions This Week!

Perfect Tour Conditions This Week!

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If your looking for a good excuse to getaway for an epic adventure now is the time! Light winds, excellent visibility, sunshine and a National Park location buzzing with marine life. Every day is never the same and your sure to experience plenty of wildlife during the best time of year!

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
Humpback Whale Migration along the East Coast of Australia

Humpback Whale Migration along the East Coast of Australia

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Humpback whales make their presence known along Australia’s east coast every year, between April and November, as they migrate to go mate and give birth after a summer of feasting on krill in the Antarctic.  This makes for a unique opportunity for residents of the surrounding coastal towns and visitors all across Australia.  A one-of-a-kind whale-watching where tens of thousands pass by, many within plain sight!

Catching a Glimpse

The wide range of months that humpback whales can be spotted making their way across the eastern coastline of Australia is due to the variation each year, usually influenced by water temp and the conditions of their feeding grounds when they are down under. The first appearances, the young males, are usually in June closely followed by pregnant whales with calves in tail.  Fully grown adult males fill in the gaps in the middle of the migration. You can quickly identify humpback groups of younger males by their playful behavior and dynamic jumps out of the water. The last whale sights are usually in November, when the whales are migrating back home.

A Lucky Sight

Humpback whales were nearly driven to extinction at the height of whaling from the 19th century and into the height of the 20th century.  After the International Whaling Commission banned humpback whaling, the humpback whale population was reduced to less than 5% of their original numbers.  Experts believe that if the ban were a year later, the numbers may have been too low for the humpback to ever recover.  Thankfully, that isn’t the case, now the humpback whales have grown tremendously in population size since the 1960s when they were still illegally hunted enmass.

Making it Count

Researchers continue to track the population growth, thanks in part by the Australian public’s volunteers who go whale watching every year to count whales from sunrise to sunset.  With oversight from scientists and expert whale watchers, the community volunteers are able to get a good count on the many thousands of humpback whales that migrate each year along Australia’s east coast.

Sydney, Eden, Port Stephens, Narooma and Byron Bay in New South Wales are some of the most popular gatherings for whale watchers, while volunteer counting is mostly focused in smaller gathers at places like Cape Solander in the south of Botany Bay and Cape Byron Lighthouse in the Cape Byron State Conservation Area.  Organisation for the Rescue and Research of Cetaceans in Australia holds official census gather for both population numbers and any noticeable changes of health or behavior of whales.

This season the humpback whale tally is expected to reach over 30,000 members.  What an incredible story of resilience for these beautiful animals.

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen

Migrating Whales Big In Numbers Early

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Over the last 6 years of operation i can definitely say that there is a significant increase in whale numbers passing Double Island. I remember early years that June and July typically there would be the odd few whales passing by close to shore on our kayak tours. We would often see many Humpback whales well out in the distant in much of a hurry to get north to warmer waters.

This seems to be changing, the last month we have seen an incredible number passing by close to shore. You only have to pick up the paper to see the large increase in encounters along the east coast. Some of the experiences we have encountered over the last 6 weeks have been incredible. We are so blessed to be able to paddle around this spectacular National Park location and from time to time see them in thier own habitat.  We are certainly looking forward to the coming months and spectacular Double Island adventures.

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
The history of Stand Up Paddling

The history of Stand Up Paddling

Stand Up Paddling

Nowadays, most of us enjoy Stand Up Paddling, but when did this trend start? And what made it so famous to begin with? You may be shocked, but Stand Up Paddling has been around for millennia. In fact, the first people that started using Stand Up Paddle boards were the Peruvian fishermen who had to rely on this paddling for a very long time. They had rudimentary boats at that point to help them catch fish and bring it back home.

Throughout the years, Stand Up Paddling became a very important trend for a lot of people. Even the famous gondoliers from Venice started to opt for this type of experience. As you can imagine, Stand Up Paddling soon became more than a trend, it became a rather unique and exciting way to move around.

The first place where people started performing Stand Up Paddling for entertainment purposes was in Hawaii. The earliest photographic evidence for this has around 60 years, which means that it wasn’t until the 1950s that people started to take a picture in the region. It was a rather unique and distinct experience for everyone, which is what made people enjoy Stand Up Paddling more and more!
Throughout human history, there’s plenty of evidence that people enjoyed and used Stand Up Paddling. From the hasake paddlers of the Mediterranean to the French standup podoscaphe paddlers and the one-legged paddling fishermen from the Inle Lake, there were a lot of people who enjoyed this type of padding, all for different purposes.

Nowadays, we mostly use Stand Up Paddling for entertainment and there’s a reason why Stand Up Paddling is getting more and more popular. People enjoy having fun, and they want to explore lagoons, rivers and seas at their pace. Stand Up Paddling allows them to do so. It gives them a sense of freedom and happiness that you can rarely find anywhere else. If you always wanted to have fun surfing, but you find it hard to stand up on the wave, then Stand Up Paddling may be one of the most attractive alternatives. It is worth it, and you will be quite impressed with the entire experience, from watching wildlife to trying to catch small waves.

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
Mind Surfing

Mind Surfing

Surf Lessons

We all know these moments in your day. When you glance social media on your phone during lunch break seeing a delicious Nias drainer spiralling down the line with all the correct ocean colours in perfect symmetry and the back ground palms looking majestic, or whilst awaiting your coffee order to be processed gazing at the artwork on the wall by the local kneeboarder depicting your main break firing on all cylinders with nothing but drooling barrels wrapping along the bank, maybe you’ve experienced it this good once or twice over the years but the fire still burns within to surf it in that perfect form.

So your mind wanders…….

It wanders to a place where you can’t wipeout , there is no drop ins, the take off is always makeable, you’re never out of position and almost always you will make it around or backdoor through that section. It’s an uninterrupted moment in time where you slip into a state of “Mind Surfing”

Elite athletes now class it as “visualisation” a training mechanism to project themselves into the moment before its actually happened, as surfers we arent setting out to win medals, our journey is for the ultimate ride..

With only a handful of lucky surfers who travel the globe chasing waves everyday, most of us only dream of daily greenrooms with the sun on our face, being able to check your favourite surf forecast app, book a ticket and get to that destination that reads five stars and light offshore.

But we can all Mind Surf!

So next time you’re scrolling your instagram feed throw caution to the wind, let your fins release, bust that air on that normally unmakeable section, or grabrail and pigdog like you’ve always wanted.

Yew!

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
How to prepare for your next surf holiday to Double Island Point!

How to prepare for your next surf holiday to Double Island Point!

Surf Lessons Uncategorized

It’s nice to be able to get out and catch Australia’s longest beginner waves with a brand new view over the coloured sands, especially if you’re traveling with friends. Heading to a new location for a surf holiday can be fun, but it always pays to come prepared whenever you’re visiting a place you’ve never been before. We’ve got you covered with a handy guide to help you plan ahead and live your holiday to its fullest!

The gear

The most essential part of any holiday prep is making sure you have everything you need for the surf trip. The good part it, you barely have to bring a thing! We supply you with all of the equipment, including boards, wetsuits, rash tops, etc! The Australian sun is very strong, so remember to be sun safe and SLIP SLOP SLAP with sunscreen, a hat and of course your swimsuit and towels.

Beat the holiday “lag”

What we mean by this is prepare for the increase in walking whenever you go on a trip, not just a surf holiday. People always get caught off guard at just how much their feet end up hurting when going on a trip to a new place and they want to see and do as much possible. Just start training your legs and feet by implementing a walking regimen as soon as you can before you trip.

Prepare to eat and drink

Exercising your belly is almost as important as your workouts. The best thing you can do before a trip is eat healthy and fill your gut with good probiotic bacteria. Traveling will always come with increased challenges for your stomach, especially if you’re someone who eats a pretty steady diet at home.

Another thing you should be mindful of is how much weight you might lose from all the surfing you’re going to do in combination with all the walking. Those calories will burn off you real fast, so don’t be afraid to bulk up a little bit before you leave for our surf holiday.

The last, but most important tip is to ALWAYS bring WATER with you! You are exercising in the sun, hydrating your body is essential to keep your energy levels high.

These tips, along with some essential traveler/tourist tips will go a long ways towards your overall enjoyment. Stay safe and have fun catching those waves!

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
Sea turtles of Queensland, Australia

Sea turtles of Queensland, Australia

Wildlife

Residents of Queensland are fortunate to have such a rich sea life right at their doorsteps. In fact, six of the seven marine turtle species of the world make their homes in Queensland. While the leatherback only visits during the winter, the remaining five stay their entire lives here. Since there is so much to learn about the differences between these beautiful creatures, we’ll cover three of the most prominent.

Green turtles

Also known as Chelonia mydas, the beloved Green Turtle has a very rounded head, helping it glide through the waters. It’s a fairly sizeable turtle, growing up to four feet long, on average, weighing over 400 pounds. It’s easily identifiable by the large scales, four on each side of the shell. Although, they are called green turtles, the shell can have reds, browns, and blacks. Green turtles like the coral reefs for protection and to feed on the algae and small prey.

A female green turtle can lay up to 115 eggs. They come to nest between the months of November and March, typically on the islands that sit north and south of the Great Barrier Reef. Raine Island is the most popular viewing location.

green-turtle

Hawksbill turtles

Also known as Eretmochelys imbricate, the Hawksbill Turtle is the smallest turtle of the bunch, growing to about three feet in length, on average and weighing around 150 pounds. Their head is very narrow and they have a beak-like mouth, hence the name. Hawksbill turtles are the only sea turtles with two pairs of prefrontal scales on the head and four pairs of costal scutes on the carapace. They have very distinct scale patterns and are easy to identify this way.

Like the green turtle, this turtle species also prefers algae, seaweed, jellyfish, etc. They will lay slightly more than the green turtle, averaging around 130 eggs. They stay around the northern Great Barrier Reef and the Torres Strait, nesting all year, but with the most occurring in the months of Jan. and Feb.

Loggerhead turtles

Also known as Caretta caretta, the Loggerhead Turtle grows to a similar size as green turtles, but with stark contrast in shape and color. Their heads are more pointed and their jaws are more prominent. Their shell has a heart-shaped pattern, with five scales on each size. Loggerheads are red and brown in color. They are less camouflaged than green turtles, for example, as they prowl shallow waters around the Great Barrier Reef for crustaceans, sea urchins, muscles, and the occasional jellyfish.

Loggerheads will lay about 125 eggs from November until the end of January on the Bundaberg Coast in Queensland or on the islands to the south.

Channel 7 - The Great Day Out TV Show | Tyron van Santen
Benefits of Surf Lessons

Benefits of Surf Lessons

Surf Lessons

Ever thought of taking surf lessons in your holiday? Surf lessons are a true delight, as you get to be active, social, close to nature, and it’s so much fun! We’ve listed a few benefits of surf lessons for you…

Better health

Maybe the best thing about surfing is that it allows you to boost your health. Primary benefits would be improved heart health and cardiovascular support, but it also provides you with the ability to get more vitamin D from the sun and being outdoors.

Muscle toning

Since surfing requires you to use your hands and paddle all the time, this does provide you with an excellent set of benefits when it comes to muscle toning. It’s a solid investment and one that will pay off very well in the end.

Finding a hobby

It’s pretty hard to find a passion and hobby, but that’s what makes surf lessons so great. They provide you with an amazing way to acquire a new hobby and expand on it. This makes it easier for you to fill your time with a passion that you never new you had!

Personal development

Committing yourself to surf lessons requires a lot of courage and effort. It certainly pays off in the end, and it allows you to grow from a mental standpoint. It’s a major boost if you want to boost your career and take it to new heights.

Being social

The simple fact that surfing makes it easy for you to be a social person is certainly one of the major benefits here. You have the opportunity to be active and at the same time interact with people that share your passion.

An excuse to travel and connect with nature

Aside from being fun, surf lessons are a great excuse just to go ahead and travel. There are so many surf spots around the globes, so many new places to visit, you’ll never get bored!

If you want to enjoy high quality, professional surf lessons, we recommend you to check out our surf lessons at Double Island Point. Learn how to surf in Australia’s longest beginner waves!